An Interview with Kinful: Bringing Cross-Cultural Empathy to Schools with VR

03/4/18 iThrive Games

How do we prepare today’s students to thrive in an uncertain world? One proven technique is for schools to wholeheartedly support students’ social and emotional development — their empathy, their ability to bounce back after failure, and their capacity to connect meaningfully and sensitively with diverse people across the world. Schools are demanding effective social […]

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Nier: Automata – True Kindness in Games Requires Sacrifice

02/27/18 James Portnow

Editor’s note: This guest-authored post was inspired by a panel discussion called “Find the Kind” at MagFest in January of 2018. The panel was led by Heidi McDonald and Sean Weiland of iThrive Games, James Portnow of Extra Credits, and Dr. Shaun Cashman of Pfeiffer University. Please note that THIS POST CONTAINS SPOILERS for the […]

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Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice – Why the World Needs a Hero with a Mental Illness

02/20/18 Courtney Garcia

Editor’s note: This guest-authored post is part of iThrive’s series on games and mental health. Articles in this series reflect iThrive’s commitment to use and design games in support of teens’ mental health and well-being, both within and outside of traditional therapeutic contexts. Talking about mental illness can be difficult, confusing, and sometimes even scary. […]

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Wallop! You Died (Again): Growth Mindset and Cuphead

01/29/18 Ian McDonald

My name is Ian McDonald. I’m 13 and I love to play games! Roleplaying games (RPGs), puzzle games, platformers, shooters…you name it. I took a quiz at a site called Quantic Foundry to tell me more about what kinds of games I might like, and my results made complete sense to me: I tend to […]

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Meaningfully and Realistically Using Games in the Classroom

01/23/18 Barbara Chamberlin

Practical barriers can keep the most enthusiastic teacher from using games in the classroom. Let’s get real — and realistic — about ways to approach game-based learning for the classroom. Teachers are busy, and usually spend much of a given school day completing work from that day while simultaneously preparing work for the next day. […]

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